Basic and Clinical Research

TOP > Basic and Clinical Research

Basic Research at TACCC

 People may believe that acute care centers are exclusively interested in clinical practice. However, saving lives is not all that matters in emergency care. Acute care physicians often encounter patients who do not respond to any available therapies. Severe sequelae sometimes prevent the patient from resuming a normal life. Therapeutic limitations arise from our ignorance of disease etiology and pathology. For these reasons, scientists around the world are engaged in basic research on topics related to emergency and critical care medicine from a wide spectrum of perspectives.

References

Ogura Y, Yamakawa K. Sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) [in Japanese]. In: Okamoto K, Yokota H, eds; Shimazaki S, Maekawa T, consulting eds.
Emergency and intensive care medicine review: latest articles and annotations. 2012-'13. Tokyo, Japan: Sogo Igaku Sha; 2013:354-62.

Matsumoto N. Basic research topics in emergency and intensive care medicine [in Japanese]. In: Okamoto K, Yokota H, eds; Shimazaki S, Maekawa T, consulting eds.
Emergency and intensive care medicine review: latest articles and annotations. 2012-'13. Tokyo, Japan: Sogo Igaku Sha; 2013:383-92.

 The emergency care physician should clarify the biological mechanism whereby the human body responds to and overcomes a systemic insult. An insult leads to an inflammatory response, representing a healing process in which the injured tissue recovers from damage. In patients with severe sepsis, however, a continuing inflammatory storm impairs physiological functions. Anti-inflammatory regulatory mechanisms are often disrupted in patients with severe sepsis. Patients with severe sepsis are susceptible to infections. Surprisingly, many patients demonstrate both a strong inflammatory response and immunosuppression.
 Emergency and acute care treatments are continually progressing, and physicians utilize advanced cardio-respiratory management technologies to improve patients’ metabolic and nutritional status. Nevertheless, physicians have no definitive therapies to mitigate the systemic inflammatory response and systematically activate the immune system. These represent the therapeutic limitations of emergency medicine.

 To overcome these limitations, Osaka University Hospital’s Department of Traumatology and Acute Critical Medicine (TACCC) carries out research to elucidate the mechanism of acute inflammation and to develop new treatments.
 Our research involves histologic, physiologic, and biomolecular studies, in which animal models of sepsis, crush syndrome, heat illness, cerebral ischemia, head trauma, and cardiopulmonary arrest are used in combination with cell culture studies.
Specifically, our research on the pathophysiology of critically ill patients encompasses the identification of new damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that induce an inflammatory response, as well as the pathology of vascular endothelial injury, which may lead to systemic inflammation, coagulopathy, and shock reactions. In addition, we evaluate the clinical features of new pharmacological agents and cell-based therapies to develop new treatments that are effective for patients in critical conditions.

Joint Research Facilities
 - Unit for Liveable Cities, Kyoto University Graduate Schools of Engineering and Medicine
 - Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Faculty of Medicine, Oita University
 - Aino Institute of Regeneration and Rehabilitation, Aino University
 - Laboratory for Nano-Bio Probes, Quantitative Biology Center, Riken
 - Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University
 - Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University
 - Various departments of the Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University